Heuristica Discovery Counsel Becomes RelativityOne Silver Partner

Heuristica Discovery Counsel Becomes RelativityOne Silver Partner

Heuristica extends its commitment to RelativityOne by becoming the world’s first law firm to achieve Silver Partner status.   Toronto, Ontario – September 11, 2020 – Heuristica Discovery Counsel LLP, Canada’s only independent, national law firm focused on electronic discovery (eDiscovery), evidence management, and related legal services, today announced that it has become a RelativityOne Silver Partner for providing exceptional service experience to its RelativityOne end users.   Heuristica is in the unique position of being the only independent Canadian national law firm with a practice dedicated to electronic evidence management and is known for its innovative approach to eDiscovery. 

U.S. Court Shifts eDiscovery Costs to Plaintiff

U.S. Court Shifts eDiscovery Costs to Plaintiff

Candice Chan-Glasgow, Director, Review Services and Counsel   August 28, 2020   In a rare cost shifting order out of the United States, Lawson v. Spirit Aerosystems (D. Kan. June 18, 2020), the Kansas District Court granted defendant, Spirit Aerosystems, Inc’s motion to shift the costs of a technology-assisted review to the plaintiff, Larry A. Lawson.  This case is a helpful reminder to litigants that the eDiscovery process must be proportionate to the needs of the case and that pursuing unnecessarily broad requests can lead to cost consequences.   Lawson is Spirit’s former CEO who retired on July 31, 2016. 

Court of Appeal Weighs-in on Relevance and Privilege

Court of Appeal Weighs-in on Relevance and Privilege

Candice Chan-Glasgow, Director, Review Services and Counsel   August 20, 2020   A recent Court of Appeal of Alberta decision, Tolton v Tolton, 2020 ABCA 218, provides a helpful reminder on the law of relevance and waiver of privilege.   Betty Tolton and Elwood Tolton separated in 1990, and Betty filed for divorce in 2002. The Toltons entered into minutes of settlement in 2007 which contained a provision indicating that Elwood was required to disclose further information related to a dispute about certain assets and accounts receivable.  In 2008, Betty filed an application seeking disclosure of the items listed in

Please vote – we’ve been nominated again!

Please vote – we’ve been nominated again!

We are pleased to announce that we have been nominated again for two Canadian Lawyer Readers’ Choice Awards.   This year we have been nominated as the best in:   Litigation Support and E-Discovery Consultants Legal Process Outsourcing / Document Review Services This is the sixth year Canadian Lawyer has run their Readers’ Choice Awards.  The program is designed to give a voice to their readers to identify which vendors and suppliers are the best at what they do.   Voting is open until August 21st and winners will be unveiled in the November 20, 2020 issue of Canadian Lawyer.  

Meaningful Disclosure

Meaningful Disclosure

Candice Chan-Glasgow, Director, Review Services and Counsel   August 7, 2020   In a decision released last month, R. v. Cuffie, 2020 ONSC 4488 (CanLII), the Ontario Superior Court of Justice considered whether the Crown’s disclosure of non-searchable PDFs constitutes “meaningful” disclosure.   The Crown provided disclosure in nine tranches, and each tranche of disclosure was accompanied by a spreadsheet which functioned as a table of contents.  The spreadsheet listed the file name of every item disclosed, the folder in which the file was located, and the date the item was disclosed.  Approximately 7,000 “written documents” (over 318,600 pages) were